20-Minute Body weight Workout for Weight Loss

20-Minute Body weight Workout for Weight Loss

Let’s face it: Finding the time to exercise is often a lot harder than your actual workout. Between work, family and friends, personal hobbies and other social commitments, many people struggle to fit fitness into their daily routine.

Body weight exercises solve this problem by giving you an effective workout that can be done anywhere, anytime, with little to no setup.

Below is an example of a body weight-based workout I did during my weight loss journey. All it took was two to three days a week to see results, and I was able to fit it in while my newborn and two-year-old napped.

Do each exercise for the desired amount of reps, quickly moving from one to the next. When you get to the end, take a 30- to 60-second break and then repeat, cycling through the routine a total of two or three times. I typically did this workout for 20 minutes and increased my time as my fitness improved.

To lose weight, you have to eat fewer calories than your body burns each day. It seems simple enough. What’s not so easy is actually doing it. How do you know if you’re eating fewer calories than your body burns? Exactly what size of a “calorie deficit” should you aim for? And how can you make sure you’re hitting the mark?

These are the questions you must answer to get on track toward your weight-loss goals. So, let’s answer them.

The easiest way to ensure you eat fewer calories than you burn is, of course, to eat very little. If you have an apple for breakfast, a small salad for lunch, a piece of toast for dinner and nothing else, you can be pretty sure you’re maintaining a calorie deficit. But you’ll also be miserable with hunger and a lack of energy.

The optimal calorie deficit is large enough to stimulate steady fat loss, but not so large that you’re always hungry and lethargic. Avoiding a calorie deficit that is too large is even more important for athletes, who need to keep their muscles well-fueled for training. The calorie deficit “sweet spot” for athletes is 300 to 500 calories per day.

There are two components to your total calories burned daily: calories burned at rest and calories burned during workouts.

To begin, add up the total number of hours you train in a typical week and divide that number by seven to yield the average number of hours you train daily. For example, if you train seven hours per week on average, it works out to one hour per day. Next, multiply this number by your body weight in pounds and the average number of calories you burn per pound of body weight per hour of training. The average number of calories you burn per hour of training is influenced by your speed. Use this table to get the appropriate multiplier

Below is an example of a body weight-based workout I did during my weight loss journey. All it took was two to three days a week to see results, and I was able to fit it in while my newborn and two-year-old napped.

 

20-Minute Bodyweight Workout for Weight Loss

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